Game Development


Our program prepares the student for careers in the increasingly competitive and in demand profession of game development.

Emphasis is placed on developing and honing hands-on skills in a team oriented environment that culminates in creating a game title for a graduating project.

Another Mobile Device ImageeTextbooks: As a student in a program that has adopted etextbooks, your required texts and digital resources will be provided to you at the beginning of each term (with the exception of general education electives). For more information and associated fees, go to http://www3.algonquincollege.com/etextbooks/

Ontario College Advanced Diploma
3 Years

Program Code: 3013X01FWO
Academic Year: 2013/2014


Our Program

This three-year Ontario College Advanced Diploma program prepares students for careers as game developers, a profession increasingly in demand by various industries including entertainment, education, government and consumer products. Strong emphasis is placed on developing the hands-on component which is offered through courses in game design and development, traditional and digital imaging, authoring, animation and programming. Students also complete individual and team-based projects.

SUCCESS FACTORS

This program is well-suited for students who:

  • Have strong observational and analytical skills.
  • Enjoy a hands-on approach to learning about the game development industry.
  • Like using computers and technology applications.

Your Career

Graduates may find employment as a game designer, game developer, game programmer, game engineer; graphic designer, graphic developer, graphic programmer, graphic engineer; software designer, software developer, software programmer, software engineer; animator, 2D/3D animator; concept artist, character artist; art director, technical director; 2D/3D artist; sound designer, sound engineer, sound technician; game tester; writer, author, scriptwriter, content developer; project manager; producer; level designer, scene designer, character designer, background designer; video designer, video engineer, video technician and instructor. Please note: Most opportunities in gaming exist outside of the Ottawa region.

Courses

Programs at Algonquin College are delivered using a variety of instruction modes. Courses may be offered in the classroom or lab, entirely online, or in a hybrid mode which combines classroom sessions with online learning activities. Upon registration, each full-time student is provided an Algonquin email account which is used to communicate important information about program or course events.
Level: 01 Hours
ENL1813M Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication. Through a combination of lectures, exercises, and independent learning, students practise writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information, and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. Communications I Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication. Through a combination of lectures, exercises, and independent learning, students practise writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information, and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. 45.0
GAM1500 Students explore the historical development of gaming and game design. Students explore the historical development of the major game makers, ATARI, Arcade, Console, SEGA, Nintendo, XBOX, Online and packaged games. Students develop an understanding of cultural, societal and technological innovation as it relates to the development of games. Other topics include the game development process and principles of game design, genres, technical foundations, artificial intelligence, ethical issues in video games, and the gaming industry and the future of gaming. History and Principles of Game Design Students explore the historical development of gaming and game design. Students explore the historical development of the major game makers, ATARI, Arcade, Console, SEGA, Nintendo, XBOX, Online and packaged games. Students develop an understanding of cultural, societal and technological innovation as it relates to the development of games. Other topics include the game development process and principles of game design, genres, technical foundations, artificial intelligence, ethical issues in video games, and the gaming industry and the future of gaming. 45.0
GAM1501 Game computations are the creative calculations that bring a video game to life. A 2D game computation is any calculation made for a 2 dimensional plane. Game computations are implemented for all aspects of a 2D video game like side scrollers and platformers. 2D computations are required for ballistic arcs, velocity, attraction/repulsion, determining objects within a viewing area, collision detection as well as game logic. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of 2D game computations. These fundamentals include, but are not limited to, the unit circle, 2D vectors, trigonometric functions, determining the distance between two points, line intersection, circle intersection, rectangle intersection, acceleration/deceleration friction and timing calculations. 2D Game Computations Game computations are the creative calculations that bring a video game to life. A 2D game computation is any calculation made for a 2 dimensional plane. Game computations are implemented for all aspects of a 2D video game like side scrollers and platformers. 2D computations are required for ballistic arcs, velocity, attraction/repulsion, determining objects within a viewing area, collision detection as well as game logic. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of 2D game computations. These fundamentals include, but are not limited to, the unit circle, 2D vectors, trigonometric functions, determining the distance between two points, line intersection, circle intersection, rectangle intersection, acceleration/deceleration friction and timing calculations. 45.0
GAM1503 The visual aspects and aesthetics of computer games are integral to the successful development and design of software applications. This course is an introduction to the visual arts. It examines a brief history of art and evolves into a studio course which explores the fundamentals of two-dimensional design: line, shape, texture, value, colour and composition. Students acquire the basic skills to develop and refine drawings and learn techniques to create realism, fantasy, shading, lighting, sequence and use colour. Instruction on the use of materials, analysis of form, and concepts of light, space and surface is provided along with the development of drawing skills. Life Drawing The visual aspects and aesthetics of computer games are integral to the successful development and design of software applications. This course is an introduction to the visual arts. It examines a brief history of art and evolves into a studio course which explores the fundamentals of two-dimensional design: line, shape, texture, value, colour and composition. Students acquire the basic skills to develop and refine drawings and learn techniques to create realism, fantasy, shading, lighting, sequence and use colour. Instruction on the use of materials, analysis of form, and concepts of light, space and surface is provided along with the development of drawing skills. 45.0
GAM1504 The foundation of most software application design and development begins with object-oriented programming (OOP). Students gain an understanding of the theory and principles of OOP, data structures, syntax, language, verification and debugging. Students explore game design concepts, such as challenge, reward, penalties, game balance, level of difficulty, artificial intelligence, game genres and the social aspects of gaming. Students learn and work with basic C++ programming structures and techniques and its object-oriented programming features and receive a comprehensive, indepth view of the C++ language. Game Development I The foundation of most software application design and development begins with object-oriented programming (OOP). Students gain an understanding of the theory and principles of OOP, data structures, syntax, language, verification and debugging. Students explore game design concepts, such as challenge, reward, penalties, game balance, level of difficulty, artificial intelligence, game genres and the social aspects of gaming. Students learn and work with basic C++ programming structures and techniques and its object-oriented programming features and receive a comprehensive, indepth view of the C++ language. 90.0
GAM1506 Students learn to make their games sound as good as they look and play! Students learn to integrate professional quality audio into their games. They also learn about sound tracks, sound creation, mood, theme and composition of sound with visual elements. Students create and edit sound for games. Other topics include audio capture, mixing, composition and integration with other assets, dubbing, narration, noise reduction, compression and the creation of music loops. Students become well versed with a variety of audio formats and techniques for creating and using audio in a game production. Sound Design Students learn to make their games sound as good as they look and play! Students learn to integrate professional quality audio into their games. They also learn about sound tracks, sound creation, mood, theme and composition of sound with visual elements. Students create and edit sound for games. Other topics include audio capture, mixing, composition and integration with other assets, dubbing, narration, noise reduction, compression and the creation of music loops. Students become well versed with a variety of audio formats and techniques for creating and using audio in a game production. 45.0
GAM1530 Students examine some of the basic concepts of psychology, such as learning, motivation, perception, sensation, information processing, emotions, stress and relaxation. They also explore various areas of group dynamics. Psychology and Group Dynamics Students examine some of the basic concepts of psychology, such as learning, motivation, perception, sensation, information processing, emotions, stress and relaxation. They also explore various areas of group dynamics. 45.0
Level: 02 Hours
GAM1502 3D Game Computations builds on the fundamentals learned in 2D Game Computations. 3D game computations are implemented in all aspects of modern console games, mobile games and desktop games. A 3D game computation is any calculation made in a 3 dimensional space. 3D computations are required for determining object translations, object rotations, viewing volumes and projections, collision detection and game logic. This course focuses on the fundamentals of 3D game computations. These fundamentals include, but are not limited to, 3D vectors, 3D vector operations, normals, matrix manipulation, matrix order of operations, rotations, determining the distance between two points in 3D space, plane intersection, sphere intersection, bounding box and lighting calculations.

Prerequisites: GAM1501 and GAM1504
3D Game Computations 3D Game Computations builds on the fundamentals learned in 2D Game Computations. 3D game computations are implemented in all aspects of modern console games, mobile games and desktop games. A 3D game computation is any calculation made in a 3 dimensional space. 3D computations are required for determining object translations, object rotations, viewing volumes and projections, collision detection and game logic. This course focuses on the fundamentals of 3D game computations. These fundamentals include, but are not limited to, 3D vectors, 3D vector operations, normals, matrix manipulation, matrix order of operations, rotations, determining the distance between two points in 3D space, plane intersection, sphere intersection, bounding box and lighting calculations.

Prerequisites: GAM1501 and GAM1504
45.0
GAM1505 Game developers develop applications for a variety of platforms, operating systems and networks. Students learn about the components of computers, technical specifications, industry standards, PC, UNIX, DOS, LINUX, WINDOWS X, and the Mac operating systems. Hardware topics include CPUs, motherboards, video cards, sound cards, memory, hard drives, floppy drives, CD- and DVD-ROM drives, SCSI devices, portable PCs and PDAs. Peer-to-peer computer networking concepts, network cabling, Local Area Networking (LAN), network interface cards, topology, hubs, types of networks and Wireless Home Networking are also covered. Computer Hardware, Networks and OSS Game developers develop applications for a variety of platforms, operating systems and networks. Students learn about the components of computers, technical specifications, industry standards, PC, UNIX, DOS, LINUX, WINDOWS X, and the Mac operating systems. Hardware topics include CPUs, motherboards, video cards, sound cards, memory, hard drives, floppy drives, CD- and DVD-ROM drives, SCSI devices, portable PCs and PDAs. Peer-to-peer computer networking concepts, network cabling, Local Area Networking (LAN), network interface cards, topology, hubs, types of networks and Wireless Home Networking are also covered. 45.0
GAM1507 The 2D and 3D graphics in most games provide the eye-candy that completes the game-user experience. Students learn to create bitmapped- and vector-based graphics for use in a gaming environment. High-end special effects, filters and 'eye candy' are the core elements to this course. The assignments and lectures cover scanning, digital imaging, painting, selection, composition, fabrication and realism in digital art. Students learn to create realistic and fantasy-based graphical content for use in a variety of games. Students also learn to create CD-ROM packaging, inserts and labels for their projects. Digital Imaging The 2D and 3D graphics in most games provide the eye-candy that completes the game-user experience. Students learn to create bitmapped- and vector-based graphics for use in a gaming environment. High-end special effects, filters and 'eye candy' are the core elements to this course. The assignments and lectures cover scanning, digital imaging, painting, selection, composition, fabrication and realism in digital art. Students learn to create realistic and fantasy-based graphical content for use in a variety of games. Students also learn to create CD-ROM packaging, inserts and labels for their projects. 45.0
GAM1508 Advanced instruction is provided in the visual aspects and aesthetics of computer games characters and animations. Students refine their abilities to conceptualize, develop and refine drawings for gaming purposes. This course is an advanced study of two-dimensional design, and techniques to create realism, shading, lighting, sequence, colour and emphasis is placed on use of materials, analysis of form, and concepts of light, space and surface. Still life, object, fantasy and realistic drawing are covered. Character Drawing Advanced instruction is provided in the visual aspects and aesthetics of computer games characters and animations. Students refine their abilities to conceptualize, develop and refine drawings for gaming purposes. This course is an advanced study of two-dimensional design, and techniques to create realism, shading, lighting, sequence, colour and emphasis is placed on use of materials, analysis of form, and concepts of light, space and surface. Still life, object, fantasy and realistic drawing are covered. 45.0
GAM1509 The course evolves a strong foundation of software application design and development. Students gain an intermediate understanding of the theory and principles of object-oriented programming (OOP), and the concepts and principles of 2D game development. Topics include coding and scripting, engine design, data structures, input, working with assets, tool development and testing. Students advance their knowledge in the C++ programming language and create simple, functioning games and projects.

Prerequisites: GAM1504
Game Development II The course evolves a strong foundation of software application design and development. Students gain an intermediate understanding of the theory and principles of object-oriented programming (OOP), and the concepts and principles of 2D game development. Topics include coding and scripting, engine design, data structures, input, working with assets, tool development and testing. Students advance their knowledge in the C++ programming language and create simple, functioning games and projects.

Prerequisites: GAM1504
90.0
GAM1510 Students are introduced to the development of professional-level projects in teams and as individuals. Students are provided with a foundation in the theory and practice of game design. Topics include game types, game mechanics, game theory, flowcharting, documentation and playtesting. Students apply these principles in the form of board game using the iteractive process. The culmination of this work is fully playable prototype suitable for submission to a game publishers. Game Design I Students are introduced to the development of professional-level projects in teams and as individuals. Students are provided with a foundation in the theory and practice of game design. Topics include game types, game mechanics, game theory, flowcharting, documentation and playtesting. Students apply these principles in the form of board game using the iteractive process. The culmination of this work is fully playable prototype suitable for submission to a game publishers. 45.0
Choose one from equivalencies: Hours
GED3013 Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following four theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FAM1218 or GED5300 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or GEN2009 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or PSI1702 or RAD2001 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED5009 or GED1896 or PSI0003
General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following four theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FAM1218 or GED5300 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or GEN2009 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or PSI1702 or RAD2001 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED5009 or GED1896 or PSI0003
45.0
Level: 03 Hours
ENL2013 Students learn how creative writing techniques can be used to develop game interactions and how to plot stories through storyboarding and developing scripts. Key components include creating and translating rough ideas into a script format, developing the storyboard and storytelling, plot, conflict, action and character development. The game development/production process, the roles of designers, artists, programmers and producers are covered. There is an emphasis on re-enforcing the issues, theory, and problems in the process of game design with instruction on the skills and tools needed for story and character development, game design, pre-production, prototyping, testing, end-user testing, human interface, content development and communication documents. An overview of the game design process, from the concept phase to the final delivery phase and planning and project management, and for game design documents and files is covered. Communications II: Scriptwriting Students learn how creative writing techniques can be used to develop game interactions and how to plot stories through storyboarding and developing scripts. Key components include creating and translating rough ideas into a script format, developing the storyboard and storytelling, plot, conflict, action and character development. The game development/production process, the roles of designers, artists, programmers and producers are covered. There is an emphasis on re-enforcing the issues, theory, and problems in the process of game design with instruction on the skills and tools needed for story and character development, game design, pre-production, prototyping, testing, end-user testing, human interface, content development and communication documents. An overview of the game design process, from the concept phase to the final delivery phase and planning and project management, and for game design documents and files is covered. 45.0
GAM1513 Students acquire a foundation in level design for games. Topics include genre analysis, gameplay styles and limitations, gameplay analysis, level construction and architecture techniques, design principles and scripting. Students are introduced to industry standard tools to build levels, and learn how the use of these tools intergrates into a workflow. They learn how levels are created using an iteractive process, from design concept to production and playtest. The course concludes with instructions for creating a complete level, featuring 3D assests, lighting and scripting. The course integrates theories and principles from a variety of disciplines to develop the fundamental skills for a level designer, which can then be applied to various projects across many platforms. Level Design Students acquire a foundation in level design for games. Topics include genre analysis, gameplay styles and limitations, gameplay analysis, level construction and architecture techniques, design principles and scripting. Students are introduced to industry standard tools to build levels, and learn how the use of these tools intergrates into a workflow. They learn how levels are created using an iteractive process, from design concept to production and playtest. The course concludes with instructions for creating a complete level, featuring 3D assests, lighting and scripting. The course integrates theories and principles from a variety of disciplines to develop the fundamental skills for a level designer, which can then be applied to various projects across many platforms. 90.0
GAM1514 Students enhance their knowledge in designing and programming gaming applications. Students gain an intermediate practical understanding of the theory and principles of object-oriented programming (OOP). Students advance their study in the C++ programming language and participate in team-based and individual projects. Students also enhance their understanding of game design concepts. Students continue to work with the C++ programming language.

Prerequisites: GAM1509
Game Development III Students enhance their knowledge in designing and programming gaming applications. Students gain an intermediate practical understanding of the theory and principles of object-oriented programming (OOP). Students advance their study in the C++ programming language and participate in team-based and individual projects. Students also enhance their understanding of game design concepts. Students continue to work with the C++ programming language.

Prerequisites: GAM1509
90.0
GAM1516 Students build on their knowledge learned in 2D Game Computations to build a 2D game. In a 2D (2 dimension) game a player interacts with a game built on a 2D plane. 2D game play programming is the art of creating game play mechanics and character behaviours to make a video game that is enticing and fun to play. This course teaches students the fundamentals and application of game play mechanics and character behaviors. This course concludes with the students working in groups to build a 2D game for a various target platforms. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and relevant applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1502 and GAM1509
2D Game Play Programming Students build on their knowledge learned in 2D Game Computations to build a 2D game. In a 2D (2 dimension) game a player interacts with a game built on a 2D plane. 2D game play programming is the art of creating game play mechanics and character behaviours to make a video game that is enticing and fun to play. This course teaches students the fundamentals and application of game play mechanics and character behaviors. This course concludes with the students working in groups to build a 2D game for a various target platforms. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and relevant applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1502 and GAM1509
90.0
Choose one from equivalencies: Hours
GED3013 Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following four theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FAM1218 or GED5300 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or GEN2009 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or PSI1702 or RAD2001 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED5009 or GED1896 or PSI0003
General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following four theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FAM1218 or GED5300 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or GEN2009 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or PSI1702 or RAD2001 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED5009 or GED1896 or PSI0003
45.0
Level: 04 Hours
GAM1511 Design, layout, type, readability, colour theory and interaction design are covered. Students learn to create interfaces for games that evolve around standard principles of human-computer interaction, interactive theory, psychology of interface design and art aesthetics. By the end of the course students produce highly intuitive user interfaces that exemplify colour-coordination, usability and professionalism. Students learn to create navigation and control, visual appeal and the functional aspects of the game interface. Hands-on exercises, projects and case studies of successful and unsuccessful user interfaces are used to illustrate and evaluate the effectiveness of user interface designs. Interface Design Design, layout, type, readability, colour theory and interaction design are covered. Students learn to create interfaces for games that evolve around standard principles of human-computer interaction, interactive theory, psychology of interface design and art aesthetics. By the end of the course students produce highly intuitive user interfaces that exemplify colour-coordination, usability and professionalism. Students learn to create navigation and control, visual appeal and the functional aspects of the game interface. Hands-on exercises, projects and case studies of successful and unsuccessful user interfaces are used to illustrate and evaluate the effectiveness of user interface designs. 45.0
GAM1512 Game assets are all the virtual objects that make up the interesting and often compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world. Students are introduced to how game assets are created in a professional game development pipeline by learning how to use sophisticated asset modeling and manipulation software. Topics include the fundamentals of game asset creation such as but not limited to, polygon modeling, texturing, lighting, rigging, skinning, animation and exporting assets to game engines. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices. Group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are also covered.

Prerequisites: GAM1502
3D Game Assets I Game assets are all the virtual objects that make up the interesting and often compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world. Students are introduced to how game assets are created in a professional game development pipeline by learning how to use sophisticated asset modeling and manipulation software. Topics include the fundamentals of game asset creation such as but not limited to, polygon modeling, texturing, lighting, rigging, skinning, animation and exporting assets to game engines. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices. Group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are also covered.

Prerequisites: GAM1502
45.0
GAM1517 Students build on concepts previously learned in 2D Game Play Programming to add the 3rd dimension needed for 3D (3 dimension) game play. Some of the most immersive and exiting games are in 3D. Students learn and apply the fundamentals of 3D game mechanics and game state management. Various examples of character control and design of reusable game components are studied and applied. Game components, such as the game shell, gameplay screen, game play mechanics, physics, collision detection and response are studied and implemented by students in a group project. The emphasis of the group project is on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work presentations to peers.

Prerequisites: GAM1516
3D Game Play Programming Students build on concepts previously learned in 2D Game Play Programming to add the 3rd dimension needed for 3D (3 dimension) game play. Some of the most immersive and exiting games are in 3D. Students learn and apply the fundamentals of 3D game mechanics and game state management. Various examples of character control and design of reusable game components are studied and applied. Game components, such as the game shell, gameplay screen, game play mechanics, physics, collision detection and response are studied and implemented by students in a group project. The emphasis of the group project is on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work presentations to peers.

Prerequisites: GAM1516
45.0
GAM1519 Students are provided with a foundation in the theory and practice of game design and production. Students acquire an understanding of the game production cycle. Topics inlcude game design, game production, management and the business of gaming. There is an emphasis on teamwork, as well as project planning and design documentation. Students are required to develop a final project, complete with a functioning game and documentation. Game Design II Students are provided with a foundation in the theory and practice of game design and production. Students acquire an understanding of the game production cycle. Topics inlcude game design, game production, management and the business of gaming. There is an emphasis on teamwork, as well as project planning and design documentation. Students are required to develop a final project, complete with a functioning game and documentation. 45.0
GAM1521 Game assets are all the virtual objects that make up the interesting and often compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world. Students are introduced to how game assets are created in a professional game development pipeline by learning how to use sophisticated asset modeling and manipulation software. Topics include the fundamentals of game asset creation such as but not limited to, polygon modeling, texturing, lighting, rigging, skinning, animation and exporting assets to game engines. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices. Group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are also covered.

Prerequisites: GAM1502 and GAM1516
Graphic and Game Computations I Game assets are all the virtual objects that make up the interesting and often compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world. Students are introduced to how game assets are created in a professional game development pipeline by learning how to use sophisticated asset modeling and manipulation software. Topics include the fundamentals of game asset creation such as but not limited to, polygon modeling, texturing, lighting, rigging, skinning, animation and exporting assets to game engines. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices. Group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are also covered.

Prerequisites: GAM1502 and GAM1516
90.0
GAM1532 Students enhance their knowledge in designing and programming gaming applications. Students gain an advanced practical understanding of the theory and principles of object-oriented programming (OOP). Students advance their study in the C++ programming language and participate in team-based and individual projects. Students continue to work with the C++ programming language. Students receive significant instruction in the C++ language and in software engineering principles.

Prerequisites: GAM1514
Game Development IV Students enhance their knowledge in designing and programming gaming applications. Students gain an advanced practical understanding of the theory and principles of object-oriented programming (OOP). Students advance their study in the C++ programming language and participate in team-based and individual projects. Students continue to work with the C++ programming language. Students receive significant instruction in the C++ language and in software engineering principles.

Prerequisites: GAM1514
45.0
Level: 05 Hours
GAM1520 Flash, Silverlight, Director, ActionScript, Dot Net, Lingo and Shockware are alternative programming mediums, which are founded on standard OOP principles. Students learn to produce a variety of applications and games. Students learn to integrate audio, video, text, graphics and code to create stunning, functioning projects for commercial, educational and entertainment use. Students enhance their knowledge of authoring paradigms to include computer-based training video sprite authoring and DVD encoding. An interesting, widely sought alternative programming medium for game designers is provided. Alternative Programming I Flash, Silverlight, Director, ActionScript, Dot Net, Lingo and Shockware are alternative programming mediums, which are founded on standard OOP principles. Students learn to produce a variety of applications and games. Students learn to integrate audio, video, text, graphics and code to create stunning, functioning projects for commercial, educational and entertainment use. Students enhance their knowledge of authoring paradigms to include computer-based training video sprite authoring and DVD encoding. An interesting, widely sought alternative programming medium for game designers is provided. 45.0
GAM1522 Students gain an understanding in digital video construction and the theory of cinematography. Students work with industry-standard software applications like Adobe Premiere and Adobe After Effects to create the stunning intros, scenes and trailers standard to most games. Students learn about video components, formats CODECs, masks, mattes, storyboarding, asset management and integrating audio with video. Students use professional capturing and editing stations and technologies to produce high-level gaming products rich with special effects. This course integrates traditional theory with the digital medium and includes topics of animation, authoring and 3D. Digital VIdeo Students gain an understanding in digital video construction and the theory of cinematography. Students work with industry-standard software applications like Adobe Premiere and Adobe After Effects to create the stunning intros, scenes and trailers standard to most games. Students learn about video components, formats CODECs, masks, mattes, storyboarding, asset management and integrating audio with video. Students use professional capturing and editing stations and technologies to produce high-level gaming products rich with special effects. This course integrates traditional theory with the digital medium and includes topics of animation, authoring and 3D. 45.0
GAM1523 3D Game Assets II builds on the concepts learned and applied in 3D Game Assets I. Game assets are all the virtual objects that make up the interesting and often compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world. Students continue to refine their skills in 3D game asset creation in a professional game development pipeline. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices in a highly collaborative atmosphere. Group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are also covered.

Prerequisites: GAM1512
3D Game Assets II 3D Game Assets II builds on the concepts learned and applied in 3D Game Assets I. Game assets are all the virtual objects that make up the interesting and often compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world. Students continue to refine their skills in 3D game asset creation in a professional game development pipeline. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices in a highly collaborative atmosphere. Group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are also covered.

Prerequisites: GAM1512
90.0
GAM1524 Students enhance their knowledge in designing and programming gaming applications. Students gain an enhanced understanding of the theory and principles of object-oriented programming (OOP). Students advance their study in the C++ programming language and/or other programming languages and participate in team-based and individual projects. Students receive significant instruction in the C++ programming language and in software engineering principles.

Prerequisites: GAM1532
Game Development V Students enhance their knowledge in designing and programming gaming applications. Students gain an enhanced understanding of the theory and principles of object-oriented programming (OOP). Students advance their study in the C++ programming language and/or other programming languages and participate in team-based and individual projects. Students receive significant instruction in the C++ programming language and in software engineering principles.

Prerequisites: GAM1532
90.0
GAM1531 Students continue their study and application of graphics languages and game computations, as well as develop their project that was started in Graphic Languages and Game Computations 1. Complex design patterns for shader passes and game logic are introduced and studied. Students then research their own ideas to ramp up the sophistication of their game projects to create an appealing player experience. Topics may include but are not limited to, advanced shaders, sophisticated cameras, multiplatform development, advanced asset control and advanced rendering techniques. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1517 and GAM1521
Graphic and Game Computations II Students continue their study and application of graphics languages and game computations, as well as develop their project that was started in Graphic Languages and Game Computations 1. Complex design patterns for shader passes and game logic are introduced and studied. Students then research their own ideas to ramp up the sophistication of their game projects to create an appealing player experience. Topics may include but are not limited to, advanced shaders, sophisticated cameras, multiplatform development, advanced asset control and advanced rendering techniques. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1517 and GAM1521
90.0
Level: 06 Hours
ENL2014 Students learn to create professional documentation for the purposes of the gaming industry. Extensive instruction is provided on resume and cover letter writing, portfolio development, email etiquette, telephone skills, memos and self-promotions. Communications III: Business Communications Students learn to create professional documentation for the purposes of the gaming industry. Extensive instruction is provided on resume and cover letter writing, portfolio development, email etiquette, telephone skills, memos and self-promotions. 45.0
GAM1525 Flash, Silverlight, Director, ActionScript, Dot Net, Lingo and Shockware are alternative programming mediums, which are founded on standard OOP principles. Students learn to produce a variety of applications and games. Students learn to integrate audio, video, text, graphics, and code to create stunning, functioning projects for commercial, educational and entertainment use. The intent is to broaden the students' knowledge of authoring paradigms to include computer-based training video sprite authoring, card authoring and DVD encoding. An interesting, widely sought alternative programming medium for game designers is provided. Alternative Programming II Flash, Silverlight, Director, ActionScript, Dot Net, Lingo and Shockware are alternative programming mediums, which are founded on standard OOP principles. Students learn to produce a variety of applications and games. Students learn to integrate audio, video, text, graphics, and code to create stunning, functioning projects for commercial, educational and entertainment use. The intent is to broaden the students' knowledge of authoring paradigms to include computer-based training video sprite authoring, card authoring and DVD encoding. An interesting, widely sought alternative programming medium for game designers is provided. 45.0
GAM1526 3D Game Assets III builds on the knowledge learned and applied in Game Assets II. Increased emphasis is placed on the polishing and refinement of game assets. Students are also taught the fundamentals of animation techniques that are used to simulate life to finished game assets. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1523
3D Game Assets III 3D Game Assets III builds on the knowledge learned and applied in Game Assets II. Increased emphasis is placed on the polishing and refinement of game assets. Students are also taught the fundamentals of animation techniques that are used to simulate life to finished game assets. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1523
45.0
GAM1528 Multi-player games are a driving force in computer games. Multi-player gaming is a major component of our society. Students learn about the technology behind multi-player games and gain an understanding of networking. Students learn the fundamentals of exchanging data over the Internet, and complete assignments leading them to the creation of a simple multi-player networked game. These games can have thousands of simultaneous players in a shared virtual world. Students examine the unique technical challenges that massive multi-player games face, discussing algorithms for bandwidth management, game synchronization, server load balancing, user authentication, security and cheating prevention.

Prerequisites: GAM1524
Multi-Player Network Gaming Multi-player games are a driving force in computer games. Multi-player gaming is a major component of our society. Students learn about the technology behind multi-player games and gain an understanding of networking. Students learn the fundamentals of exchanging data over the Internet, and complete assignments leading them to the creation of a simple multi-player networked game. These games can have thousands of simultaneous players in a shared virtual world. Students examine the unique technical challenges that massive multi-player games face, discussing algorithms for bandwidth management, game synchronization, server load balancing, user authentication, security and cheating prevention.

Prerequisites: GAM1524
90.0
GAM1529 Students develop professional-level projects. Students create resumes, demo reels, CD-ROM and/or Web Portfolios and meet employers. Instruction, field trips, guest lecturers and speakers are included. A practical, hands-on approach to game development is presented. Considerable time is spent on prototyping, testing and debugging. Game Design III Students develop professional-level projects. Students create resumes, demo reels, CD-ROM and/or Web Portfolios and meet employers. Instruction, field trips, guest lecturers and speakers are included. A practical, hands-on approach to game development is presented. Considerable time is spent on prototyping, testing and debugging. 90.0

Fees & Expenses

Tuition Fees: $2,647.87 per term in Levels 01, 02, 03 and 04 and $2,549.79 per term in Levels 05 and 06.

Information Technology Fee: $62 per term. *

Incidental Fees: $225 in Level 01, $75 in Level 02 and $50 in Level 06.
Student Activity/Sports Fee: $210.50 per term.

Student Commons/Auditorium Fee: $22 per term.

Student Centre Building Fee: $17.50 per term.

Health Service Fee: $20 per term.

Health Plan Fee: $117.02 paid once annually. **

A $40 graduation fee is payable in the final term.

A $25 transcript fee is payable in the first term a student attends Algonquin College.

International Students pay all relevant Canadian fees plus an International Premium of $4,600 per term.

* Students paying the Information Technology fee are provided with a network account, an email address and Internet access. For more information please visit our website at www.algonquincollege.com/its/services/it_fee.htm.

** Students who have coverage with another plan can request a refund by supplying the Students' Association with documentation supporting the request. This request will have to be made annually.

Books and supplies cost approximately $2,125 in the first year, $1,875 in the second year and $1,425 in the third year. Computers and supplies can be purchased directly from Algonquin's New Technology Store.

Admission Requirements 

College Eligibility

  • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent. Applicants with an OSSD showing senior English and/or mathematics courses at the Basic Level, or with Workplace or Open courses, will be tested to determine their eligibility for admission; OR
  • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) certificate; OR
  • General Educational Development (GED) certificate; OR
  • Mature student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program). Eligibility may be determined by academic achievement testing for which there is a current fee of $40 (subject to change).

Program Eligibility
  • English, Grade 12 (ENG4C or equivalent).
  • Mathematics, Grade 12 (MAP4C or equivalent).
  • A senior credit in physics is recommended.
  • Applicants with International transcripts must provide proof of either: IELTS-International English Language Testing Service-Overall band of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band; OR TOEFL-Internet-based (iBT)-overall 80, with the minimum of 20 in each component: Reading 20; Listening: 20; Speaking: 20, Writing: 20.
Should the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available places, applicants will be selected on the basis of their proficiency in English and mathematics.

Application Information

Applications to full-time day programs must be submitted with official transcripts showing completion of the academic admission requirements through:

ontariocolleges.ca
60 Corporate Court
Guelph, Ontario N1G 5J3
1-888-892-2228

Applications are available online at www.ontariocolleges.ca. A $95 fee applies.

Applications for Fall Term and Winter Term admission received by February 1 will be given equal consideration. Applications received after February 1 will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis as long as places are available.

International applicants applying from out-of-country can obtain the International Student Application Form at https://xweb.algonquincollege.com/FormIE/index.aspx or by contacting the Registrar's Office.

For further information on the admissions process, contact:

Registrar's Office
Algonquin College
1385 Woodroffe Ave, Room C150
Ottawa, ON K2G 1V8
Telephone: 613-727-0002
Toll-free: 1-800-565-4723
TTY: 1-866-620-3845
Fax: 613-727-7632
Email: AskUs@algonquincollege.com

Additional Information

For more information, please contact the Program Coordinators, Jodi Tilley at 613-727-4723 ext. 5120 or email tilleyj@algonquincollege.com or Dushan Horvat, at ext. 5516 or horvatd@algonquincollege.com or Diane Banks, Marketing Officer, at ext. 2510 or email banksd@algonquincollege.com.

Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time