Bachelor of Applied Arts – Interior Design


Algonquin College’s Bachelor of Applied Arts (Interior Design) program is one of the few interior design degrees offered in Canada, and is accredited with the Council for Interior Design Accreditation. Our students are taught to be creative strategic thinkers. 

PLEASE NOTE: If you need to complete a grade 12U mathematics credit in order to apply to this program, please click HERE for information on a part-time online course that meets the requirement.

Mobile DeviceBring Your Own Device (BYOD): As a student in this on-campus program, you will require a mobile computing device that meets the specifications outlined by your program at http://algonquincollege.com/byod

(Please note this was previously referred to as a Mobile Learning Program)

Another Mobile Device ImageeTextbooks: As a student in a program that has adopted etextbooks, your required texts and digital resources will be provided to you at the beginning of each term (with the exception of general education electives). For more information and associated fees, go to http://www3.algonquincollege.com/etextbooks/

portfolioinformationThis program requires that you submit a portfolio. Candidates who have successfully met the academic prerequisites for admission will be invited to submit a portfolio for review to complete the non-academic portion of the admission process.

 

Portfolios can be submitted anytime up until the April 30 , 2014 deadline. After April 30, 2014 we will review portfolios, if required, until the program is full. The earlier you submit your portfolio and confirm your acceptance, the better your chance of securing a spot in the program as it fills up quickly.

Bachelor of Applied Arts
4 Years

Program Code: 6148X03FWO
Academic Year: 2013/2014


Our Program

This four-year Bachelor of Applied Arts (Interior Design) degree prepares students to pursue a professional career related to the design of the built environment. The curriculum integrates professional and general studies with an emphasis on critical thinking and applied research, and is enriched with an additional focus on international perspectives in interior design.

The program contains a strong experiential component that includes simulated studio experiences, community-based design initiatives, and a 14-week co-op work term. In the fourth year, students have the opportunity to specialize in an area of interest specific to the profession and are required to complete an applied research paper. The integration of theory, analysis and practice prepare graduates to assume leadership roles within the profession. Graduates are able to apply strategic thinking and a research orientation to their responsibilities as professional interior designers, and can contribute to the development and evolution of the field of design.

This program meets the eligibility requirements of the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) at the first professional degree level. The program also qualifies graduates to meet industry standards as established by interior design professional bodies including the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), the Interior Designers of Canada (IDC), the National Council of Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ), and the Association of Registered Interior Designers of Ontario (ARIDO).

This program is part of Algonquin's mobile learning initiative. All students entering into the program are expected to have and use a laptop or mobile computing device that meets or exceeds the recommended hardware requirements as designated by the program. Students in mobile learning programs will use their devices to enhance their learning experience, obtain and work with course materials, participate in collaborative and mlearning environments and become skilled, confident users of the technologies used within an educational environment and workplace. Hardware and software specifications are outlined at http://www3.algonquincollege.com/mlearning/. Computers and supplies can be purchased directly from Algonquin's New Technology Store at educational rates.

SUCCESS FACTORS

This program is well-suited for students who:

  • Are curious about the space in which they live, work and play.
  • Want to combine aesthics, technology and human need into a highly-marketable career choice.
  • Enjoy using creative, strategic and critical thinking to solve problems.
  • Are interested in examining sustainable and global design issues.
  • Would like to take part in a paid co-op program and graduate with a baccalaureate credential.
  • Enjoy collaborative and innovative environment for learning.

Your Career

This program graduates interior designers equipped to fulfill leadership roles within the profession on a national and international level. Graduates may find employment in interior design offices, architectural firms, government planning and facilities management offices, healthcare environments, educational environments or other design and built-envoronment related fields. Graduates have the skills to work on interdisciplinary, multi-cultural design teams in a variety of settings. Over time, and with suitable experience, some graduates may wish to develop their own firms.

With this degree, graduates may also be able to continue their academic studies in interior design and related disciplines, such as environmental studies, environmental psychology and architecture.

Courses

Programs at Algonquin College are delivered using a variety of instruction modes. Courses may be offered in the classroom or lab, entirely online, or in a hybrid mode which combines classroom sessions with online learning activities. Upon registration, each full-time student is provided an Algonquin email account which is used to communicate important information about program or course events.
Level: 01 Hours
DSN4011 In this introductory course, students learn the basic principles of architectural drafting emphasizing layout, the quality of drafting, drafting expression and the communication value of this type of drawing to the designer. Students explore the intersection of drafting and freehand line. Technical Communication I In this introductory course, students learn the basic principles of architectural drafting emphasizing layout, the quality of drafting, drafting expression and the communication value of this type of drawing to the designer. Students explore the intersection of drafting and freehand line. 45.0
DSN4012 This course is the first of a series of courses which teaches students, through the study of freehand drawing, to communicate their ideas, concepts, thought processes, and design solutions in the many visual methodologies used by designers of the built environment. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the student's perception and the ability to think visually in both two and three dimensions. Students explore methods of communication in their own, as well as other cultures. Design Drawing I This course is the first of a series of courses which teaches students, through the study of freehand drawing, to communicate their ideas, concepts, thought processes, and design solutions in the many visual methodologies used by designers of the built environment. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the student's perception and the ability to think visually in both two and three dimensions. Students explore methods of communication in their own, as well as other cultures. 45.0
DSN4013 This course introduces the student to the theories of 2D design and the design principles and elements used across all design disciplines. Two and three dimensional examples with a unique focus on form, space and human perception, are studied in a broad context to allow the student to investigate and understand how these 'tools' make up the world of design around us.

Co-requisites: DSN4015
Foundations of Design I This course introduces the student to the theories of 2D design and the design principles and elements used across all design disciplines. Two and three dimensional examples with a unique focus on form, space and human perception, are studied in a broad context to allow the student to investigate and understand how these 'tools' make up the world of design around us.

Co-requisites: DSN4015
45.0
DSN4015 This course is an introduction to the two-dimensional and three-dimensional design world. Students study the abstract fundamentals of space, form and structure, as well as the principles and elements of composition, where they are encouraged to focus on the design process, as much as the design product. Students are introduced to the basic design vocabulary.

Co-requisites: DSN4013
Design Studio I This course is an introduction to the two-dimensional and three-dimensional design world. Students study the abstract fundamentals of space, form and structure, as well as the principles and elements of composition, where they are encouraged to focus on the design process, as much as the design product. Students are introduced to the basic design vocabulary.

Co-requisites: DSN4013
90.0
ENL1100 Effective communication is an integral component of success in the workplace and in lifelong learning. Students review communication theory and its connection to expository writing. Frequent writing exercises encourage the development of content that is coherent, well organized and correct. Students consider and use strategies to generate ideas, to collect and organize information, to acknowledge sources, to identify and develop a thesis and to adapt format, style and tone for different purposes and audiences. Communications and Academic Writing Effective communication is an integral component of success in the workplace and in lifelong learning. Students review communication theory and its connection to expository writing. Frequent writing exercises encourage the development of content that is coherent, well organized and correct. Students consider and use strategies to generate ideas, to collect and organize information, to acknowledge sources, to identify and develop a thesis and to adapt format, style and tone for different purposes and audiences. 45.0
HIS4000 Focus is on a broad-based survey of the history of art, design and architecture as it is reflected in the prehistoric ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian cultures through to the Renaissance and Reformation styles. Students examine various influences and discuss the outcomes of such influences. History of Art I Focus is on a broad-based survey of the history of art, design and architecture as it is reflected in the prehistoric ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian cultures through to the Renaissance and Reformation styles. Students examine various influences and discuss the outcomes of such influences. 45.0
Level: 02 Hours
DSN4021 Students build upon basic drafting skills previously studied to learn to communicate visually via accepted interior design/architectural drafted drawings such as floor plans, sections and paraline drawings. Presentation drawing production, pictorial illustration of architectural elements and measured survey drawings are all included.

Prerequisites: DSN4011 and DSN4012 and DSN4015

Co-requisites: DSN4022 and DSN4027
Technical Communication II Students build upon basic drafting skills previously studied to learn to communicate visually via accepted interior design/architectural drafted drawings such as floor plans, sections and paraline drawings. Presentation drawing production, pictorial illustration of architectural elements and measured survey drawings are all included.

Prerequisites: DSN4011 and DSN4012 and DSN4015

Co-requisites: DSN4022 and DSN4027
45.0
DSN4022 In this course, students build upon their drawing sketching skills and from this basis, continue their exploration of freehand drawing as a means of communication. Tonal value, texture, the effects of light and other methods are explored to understand the subtleties of expression.

Prerequisites: DSN4011 and DSN4012 and DSN4015

Co-requisites: DSN4021 and DSN4027
Design Drawing II In this course, students build upon their drawing sketching skills and from this basis, continue their exploration of freehand drawing as a means of communication. Tonal value, texture, the effects of light and other methods are explored to understand the subtleties of expression.

Prerequisites: DSN4011 and DSN4012 and DSN4015

Co-requisites: DSN4021 and DSN4027
45.0
DSN4023 This course is the first of two courses which explores the role of design from a historical and critical perspective. Students explore the significant forces shaping the future of design, specific implications of design decisions, the setting of priorities from the many directions possible and the implications of these decisions on future generations. Students also expand their design thinking through an examination of everyday effect of design on the whole spectrum of human activity. Current design issues, as they arise, are discussed and analyzed.

Prerequisites: HIS4000

Co-requisites: HIS4001
Issues in Design I This course is the first of two courses which explores the role of design from a historical and critical perspective. Students explore the significant forces shaping the future of design, specific implications of design decisions, the setting of priorities from the many directions possible and the implications of these decisions on future generations. Students also expand their design thinking through an examination of everyday effect of design on the whole spectrum of human activity. Current design issues, as they arise, are discussed and analyzed.

Prerequisites: HIS4000

Co-requisites: HIS4001
45.0
DSN4027 Students continue to examine the dialectic between form and space through the creation of abstract and increasingly tangible three-dimensional design problems. Exploration and more complex learning of two-dimensionality continues and includes the study of colour. The integral relationship between 2D and 3D design development is stressed. Human factors scale and materials are studied as contributors to the design of built environments.

Prerequisites: DSN4011 and DSN4012 and DSN4013 and DSN4015

Co-requisites: DSN4021 and DSN4022
Design Studio II Students continue to examine the dialectic between form and space through the creation of abstract and increasingly tangible three-dimensional design problems. Exploration and more complex learning of two-dimensionality continues and includes the study of colour. The integral relationship between 2D and 3D design development is stressed. Human factors scale and materials are studied as contributors to the design of built environments.

Prerequisites: DSN4011 and DSN4012 and DSN4013 and DSN4015

Co-requisites: DSN4021 and DSN4022
90.0
HIS4001 Students explore a chronological survey of the history of architectural and fine art periods from the Renaissance to the present day.

Prerequisites: HIS4000

Co-requisites: DSN4023
History of Art II Students explore a chronological survey of the history of architectural and fine art periods from the Renaissance to the present day.

Prerequisites: HIS4000

Co-requisites: DSN4023
45.0
PHI1000 Logic and critical-thinking skills play an important role in both daily life and ongoing academic studies. As foundational skills they support both the development and assessment of ideas, concepts and courses of action that are presented on a daily basis. Approaching the subject from both a practical and theoretical perspective, students hone their skills in analysis, argumentation, reasoning and persuasion. A range of topics and thinkers provide material with which students can exercise and apply their skills. Logic and Critical Thinking Logic and critical-thinking skills play an important role in both daily life and ongoing academic studies. As foundational skills they support both the development and assessment of ideas, concepts and courses of action that are presented on a daily basis. Approaching the subject from both a practical and theoretical perspective, students hone their skills in analysis, argumentation, reasoning and persuasion. A range of topics and thinkers provide material with which students can exercise and apply their skills. 60.0
PSY4001 Students learn about the reciprocal relationship between the built environment, natural environment and human behaviour. Students explore the distinguishing features of environmental psychology in relation to other forms of psychology, the genesis of environmental psychology and how an understanding of human behaviour influences and informs responsible design decision making. Emphasis is on the effect of design decisions on human behaviour in interior spaces.

Prerequisites: PSY2100
Environmental Psychology Students learn about the reciprocal relationship between the built environment, natural environment and human behaviour. Students explore the distinguishing features of environmental psychology in relation to other forms of psychology, the genesis of environmental psychology and how an understanding of human behaviour influences and informs responsible design decision making. Emphasis is on the effect of design decisions on human behaviour in interior spaces.

Prerequisites: PSY2100
45.0
Level: 03 Hours
DSN4031 This is the first of a series of courses which focuses on developing an understanding of the integration and coordination of building components through the study of building materials and construction details pertinent to residential construction. Applicable building codes and regulations are also examined as they relate to residential construction. An emphasis is placed upon sustainable construction and alternative building technologies.

Prerequisites: DSN4021 and DSN4027

Co-requisites: DSN4033 and DSN4037
Design Technology I This is the first of a series of courses which focuses on developing an understanding of the integration and coordination of building components through the study of building materials and construction details pertinent to residential construction. Applicable building codes and regulations are also examined as they relate to residential construction. An emphasis is placed upon sustainable construction and alternative building technologies.

Prerequisites: DSN4021 and DSN4027

Co-requisites: DSN4033 and DSN4037
45.0
DSN4032 In this course, students learn to communicate their concepts through the production of technical drawings and documents utilizing AutoCAD software. Students begin the study of computer-aided drafting to communicate their design solutions.

Prerequisites: DSN4021
Technical Communication III In this course, students learn to communicate their concepts through the production of technical drawings and documents utilizing AutoCAD software. Students begin the study of computer-aided drafting to communicate their design solutions.

Prerequisites: DSN4021
45.0
DSN4033 In this advanced studio course, learners perfect their manual communication skills through the continued study of sketch drawing techniques and particularly perspective drawings as a communication tool. An introduction to colour rendering is incorporated to expand the study of light and tone of the architectural environment.

Prerequisites: DSN4021 and DSN4022 and DSN4027

Co-requisites: DSN4031 and DSN4037
Design Drawing III In this advanced studio course, learners perfect their manual communication skills through the continued study of sketch drawing techniques and particularly perspective drawings as a communication tool. An introduction to colour rendering is incorporated to expand the study of light and tone of the architectural environment.

Prerequisites: DSN4021 and DSN4022 and DSN4027

Co-requisites: DSN4031 and DSN4037
45.0
DSN4034 Building upon the basic fundamentals of design, students are encouraged to cultivate their creative and critical-thinking skills using design thinking as a methodology for the creative process. Projects explore historical precedents, creativity and the importance of the design process at all scales of design. Collaboration and teamwork reinforce the cross-disciplinary nature of design and the important role of communication in design.

Prerequisites: DSN4013 and DSN4027 and HIS4001
Foundations in Design II Building upon the basic fundamentals of design, students are encouraged to cultivate their creative and critical-thinking skills using design thinking as a methodology for the creative process. Projects explore historical precedents, creativity and the importance of the design process at all scales of design. Collaboration and teamwork reinforce the cross-disciplinary nature of design and the important role of communication in design.

Prerequisites: DSN4013 and DSN4027 and HIS4001
45.0
DSN4037 This course synthesizes the diverse built form issues discussed in previous design studios and shifts to a more thorough investigation of interior space, both in programming and in meaning. Lectures and assignments focus upon the theoretical, historical, cultural and social aspects of housing through a cross-cultural perspective.

Prerequisites: DSN4021 and DSN4022 and DSN4027

Co-requisites: DSN4031 and DSN4033
Design Studio III This course synthesizes the diverse built form issues discussed in previous design studios and shifts to a more thorough investigation of interior space, both in programming and in meaning. Lectures and assignments focus upon the theoretical, historical, cultural and social aspects of housing through a cross-cultural perspective.

Prerequisites: DSN4021 and DSN4022 and DSN4027

Co-requisites: DSN4031 and DSN4033
90.0
PHI2000 Possessing a fundamental knowledge of performing academic research if necessary in academia. An overview of the research process and research tools prepares students to undertake research. Emphasis is on evaluation, selection and documentation of secondary sources. Students take a hand-on approach in developing research skills.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
Introduction to Research Possessing a fundamental knowledge of performing academic research if necessary in academia. An overview of the research process and research tools prepares students to undertake research. Emphasis is on evaluation, selection and documentation of secondary sources. Students take a hand-on approach in developing research skills.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
45.0
SOC4001 Sociology, through its exploration of the organization of society and the connections between people and their surroundings, provides new ways of looking at the world. Students learn the basic principles and methods of sociology and then use this perspective to examine globalization and its impact on Canadian society.

Prerequisites: SOC2000
Global Perspectives Sociology, through its exploration of the organization of society and the connections between people and their surroundings, provides new ways of looking at the world. Students learn the basic principles and methods of sociology and then use this perspective to examine globalization and its impact on Canadian society.

Prerequisites: SOC2000
45.0
Level: 04 Hours
DSN4041 In this course, students continue a study of the integration and coordination of building components in the interior environment. Sustainable principles and materials are discussed. Students examine the principles of construction methods, material selection and accessible design. Cabinet and casework construction details are examined as students continue to build knowledge of the Ontario Building Code principles and design standards.

Prerequisites: DSN4031 and DSN4032

Co-requisites: DSN4044 and DSN4047
Design Technology II In this course, students continue a study of the integration and coordination of building components in the interior environment. Sustainable principles and materials are discussed. Students examine the principles of construction methods, material selection and accessible design. Cabinet and casework construction details are examined as students continue to build knowledge of the Ontario Building Code principles and design standards.

Prerequisites: DSN4031 and DSN4032

Co-requisites: DSN4044 and DSN4047
45.0
DSN4042 This course introduces students to the importance of appropriate product and material specifications, for architectural environments. Students examine the designer's responsibility in providing aesthetic, Code-compliance, sustainable product and finish specifications for a variety of spaces. Students are introduced to the designer's role in the process of criteria establishment for evaluation, selection, product specification, product availability and impact on interior design.

Prerequisites: DSN4031
Materials and Products I This course introduces students to the importance of appropriate product and material specifications, for architectural environments. Students examine the designer's responsibility in providing aesthetic, Code-compliance, sustainable product and finish specifications for a variety of spaces. Students are introduced to the designer's role in the process of criteria establishment for evaluation, selection, product specification, product availability and impact on interior design.

Prerequisites: DSN4031
45.0
DSN4044 In this course, students strengthen their working knowledge of AutoCAD and its application beginning with an emphasis on consistency, accuracy and time saving principles and practices. As the last in the series of technical communication courses, students perfect layout and presentation of construction drawing packages.

Prerequisites: DSN4021

Co-requisites: DSN4041
Technical Communication IV In this course, students strengthen their working knowledge of AutoCAD and its application beginning with an emphasis on consistency, accuracy and time saving principles and practices. As the last in the series of technical communication courses, students perfect layout and presentation of construction drawing packages.

Prerequisites: DSN4021

Co-requisites: DSN4041
45.0
DSN4046 Students continue their investigation of design forces shaping and informing designers in the 21st century. Topics for more advanced dialogue are drawn from architectural and design philosophy, theory and contemporary areas of research in the field. Assignments help students think critically about existing design paradigms and key influencers (shelter, culture and technology, and sustainability) to help them form a deeper understanding of the complexity of their own design decisions.

Prerequisites: DSN4023 and HIS4001
Issues in Design II Students continue their investigation of design forces shaping and informing designers in the 21st century. Topics for more advanced dialogue are drawn from architectural and design philosophy, theory and contemporary areas of research in the field. Assignments help students think critically about existing design paradigms and key influencers (shelter, culture and technology, and sustainability) to help them form a deeper understanding of the complexity of their own design decisions.

Prerequisites: DSN4023 and HIS4001
45.0
DSN4047 In this design studio course, students synthesize knowledge obtained in previous courses to complete studio assignments centred upon the design of environments with an emphasis on the retail sector. Students engage in research, analysis and synthesis of information to create unique, innovative and responsible solutions to the creation of interior environments. Retail design in other cultures is studied.

Prerequisites: DSN4031 and DSN4033 and DSN4037

Co-requisites: DSN4041 and DSN4044 and DSN4048
Design Studio IV In this design studio course, students synthesize knowledge obtained in previous courses to complete studio assignments centred upon the design of environments with an emphasis on the retail sector. Students engage in research, analysis and synthesis of information to create unique, innovative and responsible solutions to the creation of interior environments. Retail design in other cultures is studied.

Prerequisites: DSN4031 and DSN4033 and DSN4037

Co-requisites: DSN4041 and DSN4044 and DSN4048
90.0
DSN4048 As the final course in the design drawing series, students are encouraged to incorporate experimentation to improve their confidence allowing them to create sophisticated work which effectively conveys their advanced design concepts and ideas.

Prerequisites: DSN4033 and DSN4037

Co-requisites: DSN4047
Design Drawing IV As the final course in the design drawing series, students are encouraged to incorporate experimentation to improve their confidence allowing them to create sophisticated work which effectively conveys their advanced design concepts and ideas.

Prerequisites: DSN4033 and DSN4037

Co-requisites: DSN4047
45.0
ENL2025 Students examine an overview of the elements of interpersonal communication and techniques for dealing with interpersonal communication challenges in the diverse workplace. Communication barriers, verbal and non-verbal communication, listening, team work and relational dynamics are addressed. Through role-play, analysis and case studies, learners engage in simulated and authentic interpersonal communication situations.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
Interpersonal Communication Students examine an overview of the elements of interpersonal communication and techniques for dealing with interpersonal communication challenges in the diverse workplace. Communication barriers, verbal and non-verbal communication, listening, team work and relational dynamics are addressed. Through role-play, analysis and case studies, learners engage in simulated and authentic interpersonal communication situations.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
45.0
Level: 05 Hours
DSN4051 In this course, students are introduced to the process of producing contract documents for a commercial space. They determine code restrictions, understand the coordination between drawings and specifications and study architectural details while completing a full set of working documents.

Prerequisites: DSN4041 and DSN4044

Co-requisites: DSN4053 and DSN4058
Design Technology III In this course, students are introduced to the process of producing contract documents for a commercial space. They determine code restrictions, understand the coordination between drawings and specifications and study architectural details while completing a full set of working documents.

Prerequisites: DSN4041 and DSN4044

Co-requisites: DSN4053 and DSN4058
45.0
DSN4052 In this lighting course, students focus on the fundamentals of light: its sources, variations, quality, design implications, product variations, technologies and cost/benefits. Students learn how to integrate appropriate lighting choices (from both technical and aesthetic viewpoint) into design decision making and the importance as a form-maker. Lighting for the specific sectors of built environments (residential, retail, corporate, etc.) is discussed and evaluated. Lighting In this lighting course, students focus on the fundamentals of light: its sources, variations, quality, design implications, product variations, technologies and cost/benefits. Students learn how to integrate appropriate lighting choices (from both technical and aesthetic viewpoint) into design decision making and the importance as a form-maker. Lighting for the specific sectors of built environments (residential, retail, corporate, etc.) is discussed and evaluated. 45.0
DSN4053 In this advanced course, students learn to use digital software tools to expand and amplify design ideas. They develop the ability to transfer concepts to a variety of programs in order to formulate three-dimensional thinking, visualize ideas and illustrate virtual spaces of their construct. Visual Communication I In this advanced course, students learn to use digital software tools to expand and amplify design ideas. They develop the ability to transfer concepts to a variety of programs in order to formulate three-dimensional thinking, visualize ideas and illustrate virtual spaces of their construct. 60.0
DSN4054 The choice and specification of many different kinds of products and materials forms a significant component of a designer's responsibility in the design and implementation of interior environments. In a workshop setting, learners investigate new, interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to product development, construction and specification. They are encouraged to research products from a variety of sources, situations and new and emerging technologies, and explore alternative uses for traditional and non-traditional materials and products.

Prerequisites: DSN4041 and DSN4042
Materials and Products II The choice and specification of many different kinds of products and materials forms a significant component of a designer's responsibility in the design and implementation of interior environments. In a workshop setting, learners investigate new, interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to product development, construction and specification. They are encouraged to research products from a variety of sources, situations and new and emerging technologies, and explore alternative uses for traditional and non-traditional materials and products.

Prerequisites: DSN4041 and DSN4042
45.0
DSN4058 This course examines increasingly complex design issues drawn from the area of corporate design. Students acquire a more comprehensive technical and aesthetic competence. Design projects explored range from a wide-variety of workplace environments and use corporate environments as a platform for the examination of broader ranged research tools and methodologies.

Prerequisites: DSN4041 and DSN4044 and DSN4047

Co-requisites: DSN4051 and DSN4053
Design Studio V This course examines increasingly complex design issues drawn from the area of corporate design. Students acquire a more comprehensive technical and aesthetic competence. Design projects explored range from a wide-variety of workplace environments and use corporate environments as a platform for the examination of broader ranged research tools and methodologies.

Prerequisites: DSN4041 and DSN4044 and DSN4047

Co-requisites: DSN4051 and DSN4053
90.0
PSY4000 Students examine human behaviour from a multidisciplinary perspective. Students also learn key biological, psychological and social determinants of human behaviour using principles from these disciplines to explain and anticipate behaviour across the life span enabling them to identify developmental tasks, special challenges and needs for each stage of human development.

Prerequisites: PSY2100
Developmental Psychology Students examine human behaviour from a multidisciplinary perspective. Students also learn key biological, psychological and social determinants of human behaviour using principles from these disciplines to explain and anticipate behaviour across the life span enabling them to identify developmental tasks, special challenges and needs for each stage of human development.

Prerequisites: PSY2100
45.0
Elective: choose 1 Hours
ENL4100 Whether for personal or public consumption, many people enjoy creative writing as a hobby or outlet for their creative energy. With a focus on short fiction, students examine the stylistic components that contribute to the excitement, atmosphere and overall readability of fiction and creative writing. The latter part of the course is organized in a workshop format in which students share their work and provide formal feedback on the work of others.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
Creative Writing Whether for personal or public consumption, many people enjoy creative writing as a hobby or outlet for their creative energy. With a focus on short fiction, students examine the stylistic components that contribute to the excitement, atmosphere and overall readability of fiction and creative writing. The latter part of the course is organized in a workshop format in which students share their work and provide formal feedback on the work of others.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
45.0
ENL4200 Speculative fiction gathers together all those works of fiction in which new worlds or alternative realities are envisioned. Within this category of prose, students have the opportunity to explore the various sub-genres that present readers with new ways of thinking about some of the issues that face society. Students also develop skills in critical analysis using a variety of approaches and methodologies from literary studies.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
New Worlds and Alternative Realities: Speculative Fiction Speculative fiction gathers together all those works of fiction in which new worlds or alternative realities are envisioned. Within this category of prose, students have the opportunity to explore the various sub-genres that present readers with new ways of thinking about some of the issues that face society. Students also develop skills in critical analysis using a variety of approaches and methodologies from literary studies.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
45.0
PHI4000 Many facets of today's popular culture engage, directly or indirectly, with the concerns of a variety of philosophical traditions. Drawing on a number of examples, students explore both the way popular culture permeates and spreads through society and the way it interprets and presents philosophical questions. As part of this course, students develop skills and techniques for assessing the soundness and validity of thought experiments.

Prerequisites: PHI1000
Philosophy and Popular Culture Many facets of today's popular culture engage, directly or indirectly, with the concerns of a variety of philosophical traditions. Drawing on a number of examples, students explore both the way popular culture permeates and spreads through society and the way it interprets and presents philosophical questions. As part of this course, students develop skills and techniques for assessing the soundness and validity of thought experiments.

Prerequisites: PHI1000
45.0
PHI4100 On an almost daily basis, the media, through its various channels-television, radio, websites, RSS, and podcasts-reports on issues that address human health and safety. Through discussions, readings, and assignments, students enhance their ability to interpret and question information presented by the media. Issues like genetically modified organisms, alternative medical remedies, transportation safety, and diet fads provide grounds for students to use principles from the sciences, social science, and mathematics as a means to think critically about real and perceived risks in daily life.

Prerequisites: PHI1000
Survival in the Information Age: Risk and the Media On an almost daily basis, the media, through its various channels-television, radio, websites, RSS, and podcasts-reports on issues that address human health and safety. Through discussions, readings, and assignments, students enhance their ability to interpret and question information presented by the media. Issues like genetically modified organisms, alternative medical remedies, transportation safety, and diet fads provide grounds for students to use principles from the sciences, social science, and mathematics as a means to think critically about real and perceived risks in daily life.

Prerequisites: PHI1000
45.0
SOC4000 The interdisciplinary study of social science examining the individual and social aspects of crime is known as criminology. Students work through an introduction to the social science perspective on crime. Presentations, discussions, and assignments allow students to investigate the various theoretical positions related to crime and criminal behaviour. Working forward from the types and definitions of crime, students trace some of the links between government policy and the impacts of these policies on both society and the individual.

Prerequisites: SOC2000
Criminology The interdisciplinary study of social science examining the individual and social aspects of crime is known as criminology. Students work through an introduction to the social science perspective on crime. Presentations, discussions, and assignments allow students to investigate the various theoretical positions related to crime and criminal behaviour. Working forward from the types and definitions of crime, students trace some of the links between government policy and the impacts of these policies on both society and the individual.

Prerequisites: SOC2000
45.0
Level: 06 Hours
DSN4061 This course examines heavy construction materials and the interrelationship between environmental systems and the structure specific to commercial construction. The Ontario Building Code regulations are again studied as are the fundamentals of specification writing through the Master Format system. Students increase their ability to transfer design concepts into production documents.

Prerequisites: DSN4044 and DSN4051 and DSN4058

Co-requisites: DSN4066
Design Technology IV This course examines heavy construction materials and the interrelationship between environmental systems and the structure specific to commercial construction. The Ontario Building Code regulations are again studied as are the fundamentals of specification writing through the Master Format system. Students increase their ability to transfer design concepts into production documents.

Prerequisites: DSN4044 and DSN4051 and DSN4058

Co-requisites: DSN4066
45.0
DSN4062 In this course, an overview is provided to the process of coordinating the design and implementation for the delivery of simple to complex interior design projects, focusing on the principles of general project management, contract documentation and administration.

Prerequisites: DSN4051 and DSN4054
Project Management In this course, an overview is provided to the process of coordinating the design and implementation for the delivery of simple to complex interior design projects, focusing on the principles of general project management, contract documentation and administration.

Prerequisites: DSN4051 and DSN4054
45.0
DSN4063 In this advanced communication course, students synthesize learning from all previous communications courses to produce advanced digital presentations of complex design projects and portfolio preparation. Students utilize various software programs combined with manual techniques to confidently create appropriate multi-media presentations in their own personal style.

Prerequisites: DSN4053 and DSN4058

Co-requisites: DSN4064 and DSN4066
Visual Communication II In this advanced communication course, students synthesize learning from all previous communications courses to produce advanced digital presentations of complex design projects and portfolio preparation. Students utilize various software programs combined with manual techniques to confidently create appropriate multi-media presentations in their own personal style.

Prerequisites: DSN4053 and DSN4058

Co-requisites: DSN4064 and DSN4066
60.0
DSN4064 This course provides students with an overview of the professional practice of Interior Design. Topics discussed include professional associations and accreditation, maintaining professional status, professional ethics, socially responsible design, business management, fee systems, career goal planning and portfolio preparation. This course introduces and launches the students' co-op preparations.

Prerequisites: DSN4058

Co-requisites: DSN4063 and DSN4066
Professional Practice and Ethics I This course provides students with an overview of the professional practice of Interior Design. Topics discussed include professional associations and accreditation, maintaining professional status, professional ethics, socially responsible design, business management, fee systems, career goal planning and portfolio preparation. This course introduces and launches the students' co-op preparations.

Prerequisites: DSN4058

Co-requisites: DSN4063 and DSN4066
45.0
DSN4066 This course introduces the advanced student to interior design problems responding to socially responsible health care issues. The focus is on understanding and proposing design solutions for appropriate environments for a full range of patients, residents and users. Environments' which students explore include hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities and wellness centres. An evidence-based approach to problem solving is applied.

Prerequisites: DSN4051 and DSN4053 and DSN4058

Co-requisites: DSN4061 and DSN4063 and DSN4064
Design Studio VI This course introduces the advanced student to interior design problems responding to socially responsible health care issues. The focus is on understanding and proposing design solutions for appropriate environments for a full range of patients, residents and users. Environments' which students explore include hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities and wellness centres. An evidence-based approach to problem solving is applied.

Prerequisites: DSN4051 and DSN4053 and DSN4058

Co-requisites: DSN4061 and DSN4063 and DSN4064
90.0
SCI2000 Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary study of how the earth works, human interaction with the earth and how to address the existing environmental problems. Students explore natural capital and the degradation of natural capital. Students engage in case studies, critical thinking and analysis of alternatives in exploring solutions and trade-offs in trying to address degradation.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
Environmental Science Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary study of how the earth works, human interaction with the earth and how to address the existing environmental problems. Students explore natural capital and the degradation of natural capital. Students engage in case studies, critical thinking and analysis of alternatives in exploring solutions and trade-offs in trying to address degradation.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
45.0
SOC2000 When working with individuals and groups it is important to understand both the background and influences present. Students develop a familiarity with sociological theories and methodological approaches used to study individual and group behaviours. Students also examine variables that include culture, social class, race, and gender and how these variables may impact work with diverse individuals and groups.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
Introduction to Sociology When working with individuals and groups it is important to understand both the background and influences present. Students develop a familiarity with sociological theories and methodological approaches used to study individual and group behaviours. Students also examine variables that include culture, social class, race, and gender and how these variables may impact work with diverse individuals and groups.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
60.0
Co-op: 01 Hours
DSN4100 This placement provides learners with the opportunity to consolidate and apply acquired knowledge and skills in a related work area. Students work as members of a design team and are challenged to address increasingly complex design situations encountered in the workplace. Students are encouraged to assess their own performance in the work they produce and to build their professional portfolios. Students have the opportunity to explore opportunities within the sector of the industry and city of their choosing.

Prerequisites: DSN4034 and DSN4043 and DSN4046 and DSN4052 and DSN4054 and DSN4061 and DSN4062 and DSN4063 and DSN4064 and DSN4065 and DSN4066
Co-op Work Term This placement provides learners with the opportunity to consolidate and apply acquired knowledge and skills in a related work area. Students work as members of a design team and are challenged to address increasingly complex design situations encountered in the workplace. Students are encouraged to assess their own performance in the work they produce and to build their professional portfolios. Students have the opportunity to explore opportunities within the sector of the industry and city of their choosing.

Prerequisites: DSN4034 and DSN4043 and DSN4046 and DSN4052 and DSN4054 and DSN4061 and DSN4062 and DSN4063 and DSN4064 and DSN4065 and DSN4066
0.0
Level: 07 Hours
DSN4071 In this course, students choose their senior project topic and undertake the synthesis, planning and research required for its completion in the following semester. With faculty guidance, yet working towards more self-directed learning, students develop and prepare a strategy and programming document as the first stages in the completion of their senior project.

Co-requisites: DSN4073 and ENL2015
Senior Project I In this course, students choose their senior project topic and undertake the synthesis, planning and research required for its completion in the following semester. With faculty guidance, yet working towards more self-directed learning, students develop and prepare a strategy and programming document as the first stages in the completion of their senior project.

Co-requisites: DSN4073 and ENL2015
45.0
DSN4073 This advanced course is designed to give students an understanding of applied research, the process of applying existing knowledge or processes to create useful products or services. A major applied research project serves as the vehicle for developing skills in analyzing qualitative data, establishing an implementation plan, conducting research and reporting on it.

Co-requisites: DSN4071 and ENL2015
Applied Research This advanced course is designed to give students an understanding of applied research, the process of applying existing knowledge or processes to create useful products or services. A major applied research project serves as the vehicle for developing skills in analyzing qualitative data, establishing an implementation plan, conducting research and reporting on it.

Co-requisites: DSN4071 and ENL2015
45.0
DSN4076 Students apply knowledge obtained in the previous years to complete studio assignments centered upon complex environments with an emphasis on the hospitality sector. They engage in advanced research, analysis and synthesis of information to create unique, innovative and responsible solutions as faculty take on an "advisory role," similar to that of a senior designer in an office setting.

Prerequisites: DSN4054 and DSN4061 and DSN4066
Design Studio VII Students apply knowledge obtained in the previous years to complete studio assignments centered upon complex environments with an emphasis on the hospitality sector. They engage in advanced research, analysis and synthesis of information to create unique, innovative and responsible solutions as faculty take on an "advisory role," similar to that of a senior designer in an office setting.

Prerequisites: DSN4054 and DSN4061 and DSN4066
90.0
DSN4077 In this course, students learn and apply the principles and theories of preservation and adaptive reuse to historical or non-historical buildings. They also delve in historical Canadian architecture and building methods.

Prerequisites: DSN4054 and DSN4061 and DSN4062
Preservation and Adaptive Reuse In this course, students learn and apply the principles and theories of preservation and adaptive reuse to historical or non-historical buildings. They also delve in historical Canadian architecture and building methods.

Prerequisites: DSN4054 and DSN4061 and DSN4062
45.0
ECO2000 Environmental economics examines the way human decisions affect the quality of the environment, about how human values and institutions shape our demands for improvements in the quality and, most especially, about how to design effective public policies to bring about these improvements. Students analyze and solve problems relating to environmental policy analysis in the Canadian context.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
Environmental Economics Environmental economics examines the way human decisions affect the quality of the environment, about how human values and institutions shape our demands for improvements in the quality and, most especially, about how to design effective public policies to bring about these improvements. Students analyze and solve problems relating to environmental policy analysis in the Canadian context.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
45.0
ENL2015 In this advanced course, students concurrently work on an applied research and a senior project. Techniques for reporting technical information, developing an academic style, and communicating clearly, correctly and coherently are emphasized. As participants complete drafts of academic writing, they are reviewed and revised based upon peer and professor feedback.

Co-requisites: DSN4071 and DSN4073
Academic and Technical Writing In this advanced course, students concurrently work on an applied research and a senior project. Techniques for reporting technical information, developing an academic style, and communicating clearly, correctly and coherently are emphasized. As participants complete drafts of academic writing, they are reviewed and revised based upon peer and professor feedback.

Co-requisites: DSN4071 and DSN4073
45.0
Level: 08 Hours
CUL4000 Informed citizens in today's world have knowledge of the meaning of civic life at the local, national and global level. Students reflect on and develop a personal awareness of the meaning of freedoms, rights and obligations in a diverse global community and consider the political, social and economic drivers that influence patterns of human behaviour and the health of the planet. Based on general principles of global citizenship, students look beyond national borders to consider personal responsibilities related to the health and well being of the planet and inhabititants. Students critically evaluate information related to environmental and social health and pursue a journey into adopting attitudes and behaviours that foster global environmental and social responsibility.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
Global Citizenship Informed citizens in today's world have knowledge of the meaning of civic life at the local, national and global level. Students reflect on and develop a personal awareness of the meaning of freedoms, rights and obligations in a diverse global community and consider the political, social and economic drivers that influence patterns of human behaviour and the health of the planet. Based on general principles of global citizenship, students look beyond national borders to consider personal responsibilities related to the health and well being of the planet and inhabititants. Students critically evaluate information related to environmental and social health and pursue a journey into adopting attitudes and behaviours that foster global environmental and social responsibility.

Prerequisites: ENL1100 and PHI1000
45.0
DSN4080 Having studied many of the issues, practices and opportunities of the major sectors of the design profession, students choose their own complex design project for completion and presentation to faculty, students and invited guests. Students work independently with faculty guidance in a simulated design/architecture office environment. Learners are expected to engage in research, analysis and reflection to generate creative professional level design outcomes.

Prerequisites: DSN4071 and DSN4073 and ENL2015
Senior Project II Having studied many of the issues, practices and opportunities of the major sectors of the design profession, students choose their own complex design project for completion and presentation to faculty, students and invited guests. Students work independently with faculty guidance in a simulated design/architecture office environment. Learners are expected to engage in research, analysis and reflection to generate creative professional level design outcomes.

Prerequisites: DSN4071 and DSN4073 and ENL2015
120.0
DSN4081 This is an advanced theory course which focuses upon readings and discussions of contemporary thought and movements within the field of interior design and architecture with special emphasis on the future of design and design criticism. Through guest lectures and a variety of topics, students reflect upon current design issues, trends and implications for future design interventions.

Prerequisites: ENL2015 and PHI1000
Senior Seminar This is an advanced theory course which focuses upon readings and discussions of contemporary thought and movements within the field of interior design and architecture with special emphasis on the future of design and design criticism. Through guest lectures and a variety of topics, students reflect upon current design issues, trends and implications for future design interventions.

Prerequisites: ENL2015 and PHI1000
45.0
DSN4083 In this advanced course, students continue their study of workplace practices, business management and prepare for employment as a professional designer after graduation. Students engage in research, analysis, and discussion of topics related to varying workplace environments and practices both in Canada and abroad in order to better understand international design and business practices.

Prerequisites: DSN4064 and DSN4076
Professional Practice and Ethics II In this advanced course, students continue their study of workplace practices, business management and prepare for employment as a professional designer after graduation. Students engage in research, analysis, and discussion of topics related to varying workplace environments and practices both in Canada and abroad in order to better understand international design and business practices.

Prerequisites: DSN4064 and DSN4076
45.0
ENL4016 Students explore the key texts from 20th and 21st century World Literature. Readings provide an introduction to themes, styles and writers from a variety of cultures. Critical analysis of texts supports the development of arguments related to the assigned readings.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
World Literature Students explore the key texts from 20th and 21st century World Literature. Readings provide an introduction to themes, styles and writers from a variety of cultures. Critical analysis of texts supports the development of arguments related to the assigned readings.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
45.0
Elective: choose 1 Hours
ENL4100 Whether for personal or public consumption, many people enjoy creative writing as a hobby or outlet for their creative energy. With a focus on short fiction, students examine the stylistic components that contribute to the excitement, atmosphere and overall readability of fiction and creative writing. The latter part of the course is organized in a workshop format in which students share their work and provide formal feedback on the work of others.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
Creative Writing Whether for personal or public consumption, many people enjoy creative writing as a hobby or outlet for their creative energy. With a focus on short fiction, students examine the stylistic components that contribute to the excitement, atmosphere and overall readability of fiction and creative writing. The latter part of the course is organized in a workshop format in which students share their work and provide formal feedback on the work of others.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
45.0
ENL4200 Speculative fiction gathers together all those works of fiction in which new worlds or alternative realities are envisioned. Within this category of prose, students have the opportunity to explore the various sub-genres that present readers with new ways of thinking about some of the issues that face society. Students also develop skills in critical analysis using a variety of approaches and methodologies from literary studies.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
New Worlds and Alternative Realities: Speculative Fiction Speculative fiction gathers together all those works of fiction in which new worlds or alternative realities are envisioned. Within this category of prose, students have the opportunity to explore the various sub-genres that present readers with new ways of thinking about some of the issues that face society. Students also develop skills in critical analysis using a variety of approaches and methodologies from literary studies.

Prerequisites: ENL1100
45.0
PHI4000 Many facets of today's popular culture engage, directly or indirectly, with the concerns of a variety of philosophical traditions. Drawing on a number of examples, students explore both the way popular culture permeates and spreads through society and the way it interprets and presents philosophical questions. As part of this course, students develop skills and techniques for assessing the soundness and validity of thought experiments.

Prerequisites: PHI1000
Philosophy and Popular Culture Many facets of today's popular culture engage, directly or indirectly, with the concerns of a variety of philosophical traditions. Drawing on a number of examples, students explore both the way popular culture permeates and spreads through society and the way it interprets and presents philosophical questions. As part of this course, students develop skills and techniques for assessing the soundness and validity of thought experiments.

Prerequisites: PHI1000
45.0
PHI4100 On an almost daily basis, the media, through its various channels-television, radio, websites, RSS, and podcasts-reports on issues that address human health and safety. Through discussions, readings, and assignments, students enhance their ability to interpret and question information presented by the media. Issues like genetically modified organisms, alternative medical remedies, transportation safety, and diet fads provide grounds for students to use principles from the sciences, social science, and mathematics as a means to think critically about real and perceived risks in daily life.

Prerequisites: PHI1000
Survival in the Information Age: Risk and the Media On an almost daily basis, the media, through its various channels-television, radio, websites, RSS, and podcasts-reports on issues that address human health and safety. Through discussions, readings, and assignments, students enhance their ability to interpret and question information presented by the media. Issues like genetically modified organisms, alternative medical remedies, transportation safety, and diet fads provide grounds for students to use principles from the sciences, social science, and mathematics as a means to think critically about real and perceived risks in daily life.

Prerequisites: PHI1000
45.0
SOC4000 The interdisciplinary study of social science examining the individual and social aspects of crime is known as criminology. Students work through an introduction to the social science perspective on crime. Presentations, discussions, and assignments allow students to investigate the various theoretical positions related to crime and criminal behaviour. Working forward from the types and definitions of crime, students trace some of the links between government policy and the impacts of these policies on both society and the individual.

Prerequisites: SOC2000
Criminology The interdisciplinary study of social science examining the individual and social aspects of crime is known as criminology. Students work through an introduction to the social science perspective on crime. Presentations, discussions, and assignments allow students to investigate the various theoretical positions related to crime and criminal behaviour. Working forward from the types and definitions of crime, students trace some of the links between government policy and the impacts of these policies on both society and the individual.

Prerequisites: SOC2000
45.0

Fees & Expenses

Tuition Fees: $7,312.98 in year 1, $7,173.70 in year 2, $6,908 in year 3 and $6,652.14 in year 4.

Information Technology Fee: $62 per term. *

Mobile Computing Fee: $150 per term. **

Student Activity/Sports Fee: $210.50 per term.

Student Commons/Auditorium Fee: $22 per term.

Student Centre Building Fee: $17.50 per term.

Health Service Fee: $20 per term.

Health Plan Fee: $117.02 paid once annually. ***

A $40 graduation fee is payable in the final term.

A $25 transcript fee is payable in the first term a student attends Algonquin College.

International Students pay all relevant Canadian fees plus an International Premium of $3,800 per term.

* Students paying the Information Technology fee are provided with a network account, an email address, and Internet access. For more information please visit our website at www.algonquincollege.com/its/services/it_fee.htm.

** The Mobile Computing Fee covers the costs associated with providing various services to students registered in a mandatory laptop programs.

*** Students who have coverage with another plan can request a refund by supplying the Students' Association with documentation supporting the request. This request will have to be made annually.

Co-op Fee: $465 payable on fees due date, in the term preceding the work term. Students on a co-op work term will pay 10% of the Student Activity and Building Fees. Co-op students on work term in the Fall will pay the Health Plan Fee.

Books and supplies cost approximately $3,000 in the first year, $3,500 in the second year, $5,500 in the third year and approximately $3,150 in the fourth year of study. In the third year, students will be required to purchase a laptop. Please note that there will be a laptop service fee of $150 per term in both third and fourth year.

Admission Requirements 

College Eligibility

  • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent.
  • Mature students are applicants who have not achieved the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or its equivalent and who are at least 19 years of age on or before the commencement of the program in which they intend to enrol. Mature students have demonstrated academic abilities equivalent to those of Ontario high school graduates, verified by successful completion of courses at the postsecondary level.

Program Eligibility

  • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with a minimum of six Grade 12U or M credits including at least one Grade 12U English and Grade 12U Mathematics. An overall average of 65% in six Grade 12 U, or M. or OAC courses is required. Subject to competition, applicants may be required to present grades/averages at 70%.

Non-Academic Criteria: design@algonquincollege.com.

In addition, applicants will be invited to attend an optional information session for the opportunity to view sample portfolios and student work as well as meet faculty and obtain program details.

Algonquin College generally offers a preparatory mathematics course for those applicants who do not have the prerequisite 12U mathematics credit required for admission to the BAA (Interior Design) program for the academic year. Final determination regarding the commencement of this course will be dependent upon applicant requirements once applications have been received. Applicants who do not have the prerequisite 12U mathematics credit are encouraged to contact the local School Board or equivalent for information regarding course opportunities to meet this prerequisite requirement.

  • Applicants with International transcripts must provide proof of either: IELTS-International English Language Testing Service-Overall band of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each band; OR TOEFL-Internet-based (iBT)-overall 90, with the minimum in each component: Reading: 21; Listening: 20; Speaking: 27; Writing: 22.

Interested applicants are welcome to address any portfolio-related inquiries to: design@algonquincollege.com

In addition, applicants will be invited to attend an optional information session for the opportunity to view sample portfolios and student work as well as meet faculty and obtain program details.

Should the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available places, applicants will be selected on the basis of their proficiency in English.

Application Information

Applications to full-time day programs must be submitted with official transcripts showing completion of the academic admission requirements through:

ontariocolleges.ca
60 Corporate Court
Guelph, Ontario N1G 5J3
1-888-892-2228

Students currently enrolled in an Ontario secondary school should contact their Guidance Office to apply. For all other applicants, applications are available online at www.ontariocolleges.ca. A $95 fee applies.

Applications for Fall Term and Winter Term admission received by February 1 will be given equal consideration. Applications received after February 1 will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis as long as places are available.

International applicants applying from out-of-country can obtain the International Student Application Form at https://xweb.algonquincollege.com/FormIE/index.aspx or by contacting the Registrar's Office.

For further information on the admissions process, contact:

Registrar's Office
Algonquin College
1385 Woodroffe Ave, Room C150
Ottawa, ON K2G 1V8
Telephone: 613-727-0002
Toll-free: 1-800-565-4723
TTY: 1-866-620-3845
Fax: 613-727-7632
Email: AskUs@algonquincollege.com

Additional Information

Algonquin College has been granted a consent by the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities to offer this applied degree for a five-year term starting October 17, 2008. Renewal of Ministerial Consent is a cyclical process. Algonquin College has applied for renewal. The College shall ensure that all students admitted to the above-named program during the period of consent have the opportunity to complete the program within a reasonable timeframe.

Transfer Credit Recognition

Applicants with degrees or degree level courses from Canadian institutions empowered to award degrees and from other degree granting institutions recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) will be assessed on a case-by-case basis. To receive a course credit, a minimum grade of C (65%) is required. Official transcripts and course
descriptions/outlines must be presented with the application for credit recognition. Applicants with degrees or degree level courses from countries other than Canada or from postsecondary institutions not recognized by the MTCU must have their degrees evaluated by a recognized Canadian public or private institution that specializes in the evaluation of international degree programs.

Advanced Standing

Graduates of an advanced (3-year) diploma from a recognized interior design program with a minimum cumulative grade point of 3.0 (B) may be eligible to undertake a six course online bridging program which must be successfully completed to enter into the fourth year of the Bachelor of Applied Arts (Interior Design) program. Bridging students must also complete a minimum of 14 weeks in a paid summer cooperative placement. Students are strongly encouraged to seek employment with firms who are members of professional associations such as IDC, ARIDO, OAA, OAQ, APDI or ASID. Applicants must submit a complete transcript from the previous academic institution and course descriptions for all courses taken within the advanced diploma. The submission of a personal portfolio is also required. For information on how to prepare this portfolio and submission details, please refer to Algonquin's document entitled "Bridging to Algonquin College's 4th BAA - located on the bridging program website at:
http://www2.algonquincollege.com/mediaanddesign/bachelorof-applied-arts-interi. Further information on bridging course requirements and the cooperative placement are also detailed at this link.

Degree Elective Information

Students may choose from a variety of breadth courses. Courses from a range of disciplines are offered within the humanities, social sciences, sciences, global cultures and mathematics. Elective offerings vary from semester to semester.

Co-op Information

Students are required to independently complete the co-op preparation online modules, must actively conduct a self-directed job search and are responsible to secure approved program related co-op placement (s). Algonquin College's Co-op Office provides assistance in developing co-op opportunities and facilitates the overall co-op process. http://www.algonquincollege.com/coop/
International Student Information

International students are assessed individually. All candidates must have OSSD equivalencies and/or postsecondary equivalencies assessed by an appropriate body. Inquiries regarding eligibility of this nature should be directed specifically to Algonquin's International Students' Office.

For more information, please visit www.algonquincollege.com for program updates as they become available or email interiordesign@algonquincollege.com or call 613-727-4723 ext. 7563.

Specifications for laptop requirements can be found at
www.algonquincollege.com/its/laptop.

Awards & Bursaries

For information on awards and bursaries available to students of this program, please visit the awards and bursaries page.

Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time